Delaware Jury Duty/ Court Appearance: What you need to know

Prospective jurors claiming exclusion must submit proof of the disqualification, such as a note from a physician. Prospective jurors who are not disqualified, but are requesting postponement of service, must show that undue hardship, extreme inconvenience, or public necessity precludes them from serving on the date of summons. The court will reschedule the jury service at its discretion (DE Code Tit. 10 Sec. 4511et seq.).
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Jury duty. An employer may not threaten or otherwise coerce or discharge an employee who has been called for prospective jury service or who serves as a juror. Any employer that violates this section is guilty of criminal contempt and may be fined $500, imprisoned for 6 months, or both. An employer that discharges an employee because of jury service may be liable for lost wages and reasonable attorney's fees and may be ordered to reinstate the employee (DE Code Tit. 10 Sec. 4515).
Court appearance. An employer may not discharge or discipline a victim or a representative of the victim for participation at the prosecutor's request in preparation for a criminal justice proceeding, attendance at a criminal justice proceeding if the attendance is reasonably necessary to protect the interests of the victim, or attendance at a criminal justice proceeding in response to a subpoena (DE Code Tit. 11 Sec. 9409).
Under Delaware law, jurors are to receive per diem reimbursements from the court for travel, parking, and other out-of-pocket expenses. Employers may not consider these reimbursements to be pay (DE Code Tit. 10 Sec. 4514).
Delaware law does not require employers to pay employees for absences due to jury duty or court appearance. Although not required to do so, many employers ...

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