|
|

Vacations: What you need to know

There is no federal law that entitles private sector employees to paid or unpaid vacation; nonetheless, most employers do give employees time off for vacation, and employees generally consider this to be one of their most important benefits.
Though there is no federal vacation law, there is a steadily growing body of state law—an amalgam of statutes and court decisions—that controls how employers administer vacation time, including whether and how much employees must be paid at termination for accrued but unused vacation.
Employers must know the laws in their state(s) of operation in order to develop a comprehensive, compliant policy covering eligibility, accrual, carryover, forfeiture, administration, pay upon termination, and integration of vacation policy with other state laws—and to ensure strict compliance and consistency of administration.
For a Limited Time receive a FREE HR Report on the "Critical HR Recordkeeping”.  This exclusive special report covers hiring records, employment relationships, termination records, litigation issues, electronic information issues, tips for better recordkeeping, and a list of legal requirements.  Download Now
Accrual is simply the particular method by which vacation time is accumulated; employers may generally set vacation accrual methods however they wish.
For example, some organizations provide all vacation time in a lump sum at the beginning of the calendar year or upon an employee’s anniversary date. Others prefer to have vacation accrue steadily throughout the year—with hours of paid leave earned with each pay period. Some organizations require new employees to work a certain number of days before earning vacation time, while others may offer generous leave benefits immediately upon hire for an attractive sign-on incentive.
(Note: This guidance is specific to vacation time; time off that is to be used for illness may be subject to additional requirements under state and local law.) Additional information on sick leave requirements is ...

>> Read more about Vacations

More on this topic:

State Requirements

Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | District of Columbia | Florida | Georgia | Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming |

Vacations Resources

Vacations Products

Solving PTO Problems Webinar Recording
Solving PTO Problems: How to Reduce Unscheduled Absences Without Alienating Employees or Violating the Law"
Perfecting Your PTO Policy Recording
BLR Webinar: "Perfecting Your PTO Policy: How to Curb Abuse, Cut Absenteeism, and Comply with the Law""
Free Special Reports
Get Your FREE HR Management Special Report. Download Any One Of These FREE Special Reports, Instantly!
Featured Special Report
Claim Your Free Copy of Critical HR Recordkeeping

Record retention is complex and time consuming. However, in addition to complying with various federal and state laws, keeping good, well-organized records can be very helpful in documenting and supporting an organization’s employment actions.
Download Now!


This special report will discuss how you can ensure your records are in good order, and establish a record-retention policy.

Topics covered:
1. Hiring Records
2. Employment Relationships
3. Termination Records
4. Litigation Issues
5. Electronic Information Issues
6. Tips for Better Recordkeeping
7. A List of Legal Requirements

Make sure you have the information you need to know to keep your records in order.