|
|

Hours of Work: What you need to know

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires that a minimum wage be paid for all hours an employee is “suffered or permitted” to work and that an overtime wage be paid for all hours “worked” over 40 in a week. The FLSA does not specifically define “hours worked” or place a limit on the number of hours an employee may work; it requires only that overtime be paid for any hours worked over 40. Generally speaking, work time includes all time that employees spend engaged in the principal activities that they are employed to perform. Hours worked also includes waiting time, travel time, other than time spent commuting to and from the employee’s regular place of work; breaks or meal periods that are less than 20 minutes long; and time the employee is required to spend in training, at seminars, or in meetings. Hours worked for purposes of the FLSA do not include waiting time, time spent on call, or time when an employee is required to carry a pager or cell phone, provided the employee is otherwise free to effectively use the time for his or her own personal purposes. The FLSA does not obligate employers to pay employees for holidays, vacation, or sick days.
For a Limited Time receive a FREE HR Report on the "Critical HR Recordkeeping”.  This exclusive special report covers hiring records, employment relationships, termination records, litigation issues, electronic information issues, tips for better recordkeeping, and a list of legal requirements.  Download Now
Check state law requirements. Many states have laws on hours of work that are more strict than federal requirements. Employers must follow the law that is most favorable to the employee.
The general rule is that work time begins when the employee begins doing activities on the employer's behalf and ends when those activities conclude. For example, normal commuting from home to work is ordinarily not considered work time, whereas time spent walking from the time clock to the workstation is generally ...

>> Read more about Hours of Work

Related Topics

More on this topic:

State Requirements

Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | California | Colorado | District of Columbia | Florida | Georgia | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kentucky | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Missouri | Montana | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Texas | Utah | Washington | West Virginia | Wyoming |

Hours of Work Resources

Hours of Work Products

Free Special Reports
Get Your FREE HR Management Special Report. Download Any One Of These FREE Special Reports, Instantly!
Featured Special Report
Claim Your Free Copy of Critical HR Recordkeeping

Record retention is complex and time consuming. However, in addition to complying with various federal and state laws, keeping good, well-organized records can be very helpful in documenting and supporting an organization’s employment actions.
Download Now!


This special report will discuss how you can ensure your records are in good order, and establish a record-retention policy.

Topics covered:
1. Hiring Records
2. Employment Relationships
3. Termination Records
4. Litigation Issues
5. Electronic Information Issues
6. Tips for Better Recordkeeping
7. A List of Legal Requirements

Make sure you have the information you need to know to keep your records in order.