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Living Wage: What you need to know

What is a living wage ordinance? A living wage is a pay rate above the minimum wage that is considered to be sufficient to meet basic subsistence needs in a particular geographic area. Contractors who do business with a city or county that has a living wage ordinance must pay their employees at least a certain hourly rate and comply with other provisions of the ordinance, such as offering health benefits, providing leave, maintaining adequate records, and/or posting notice about living wage provisions.
Note: President Obama signed an executive order raising the minimum wage for federal contract workers for all federal contracts beginning on or after January 1, 2015. The new minimum wage will be $10.10 per hour, up from $7.25 per hour.
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Living wage ordinances apply primarily to certain service contractors (and sometimes their subcontractors) doing business with a city or county government, contractors who receive financial assistance from the city or county, and/or city or county employees. Some ordinances require that both part-time and full-time workers be paid the living wage, and some refer only to particular types of jobs, such as healthcare workers, food service workers, janitors, security guards, landscapers, or clerical workers.
Because some ordinances include provisions for automatic increases in the hourly wage rate on particular dates, or adjustments as a result of changes in the federal poverty level, employers should always determine the current requirements--even if they have done business with the same city in the past. Depending on the ordinance requirements, the city might be obligated to notify contractors of the ...

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2013 EHS Salary Guide:
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BLR's 2013 EHS Salary Guide will help you evaluate if you are being paid a fair amount for the responsibilities you are shouldering. In addition, EHS managers can find the information to keep their departments competitive and efficient—paying the right amount to retain hard-to-fill positions but not overpaying on others. Includes data for positions specific to the EHS field."
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BLR's 2013 EHS Salary Guide will help you evaluate if you are being paid a fair amount for the responsibilities you are shouldering. In addition, EHS managers can find the information to keep their departments competitive and efficient—paying the right amount to retain hard-to-fill positions but not overpaying on others. Includes data for positions specific to the EHS field."
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