Oklahoma Rest Periods: What you need to know

Federal wage and hour law does not require that employees be provided with either paid or unpaid rest or meal periods. Whether breaks are required is left up to the states. Oklahoma has provisions requiring work breaks that apply to employees under the age of 16 and to employees who are nursing mothers.
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U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division regulations do specify when provided work breaks, including meal periods, rest periods, and sleeping time, must be counted as work time subject to federal minimum wage and overtime requirements (29 CFR 785.18 through 785.23).
Under Oklahoma law, employees under the age of 16 may not work more than 5 consecutive hours without a 30-minute rest period and must be permitted a 1-hour cumulative rest period for each 8 consecutive hours worked (OK Stat. Tit. 40 Sec. 75).
State law provides that employers are to provide reasonable unpaid break time each day to an employee who needs to breastfeed or express breast milk for her child to maintain milk supply and comfort. The break time, if possible, should run concurrently with any break time, paid or unpaid, already provided to the employee. An employer is not required to provide break time under the law if to do so would create an undue hardship on the operations of the employer. State law provides that an employer may make a reasonable effort to provide a private, secure, and sanitary room or other location in close proximity to the work area, other than a toilet stall, where an employee can express her milk or breastfeed her child (OK Stat. Tit. 40 Sec. 435).
For purposes of this law, a "reasonable effort" means any effort that would not impose an undue hardship on the ...

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