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Arizona Equal Pay/Comparable Worth: What you need to know

Arizona's Equal Pay Law prohibits employers from paying lower wages to any employee than it pays to employees of the opposite sex for the same quantity and quality of work in the same classification. Agreements to work for a wage lower than that paid for the same work to employees of the opposite sex are void and unenforceable. The Law applies to all employers, both public and private, regardless of size (AZ Rev. Stat. Sec. 23-340 et seq.).
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Variations in pay for male and female employees in the same classification of work are allowed if based on:
• Seniority
• Length of service
• Ability and skill
• Difference in duties performed
• Hours of work, shift, or time of day worked
• Restrictions on lifting objects in excess of specified weight
• Other reasonable factors not related to gender
Such pay variations must also be exercised in good faith.
The Arizona Industrial Commission enforces the Equal Pay Law if the amount of unpaid wages is $2,500 or less (AZ Admin. Code Sec. R20-5-1006). A claim must be filed within 1 year of the accrual of the claim. Upon receipt of a complaint from an employee, the Commission is authorized to take any action deemed necessary to enforce the payment of any amount found by the Commission to be due to the employee. Any employer that violates the equal pay provisions is liable to the employees affected for the amount of the deprived wages together with the costs of the employee's equal pay suit.
An employee may also file a civil action in state court to recover wages due (AZ Rev. Stat. Sec. 23-341). Suits must be brought within 6 months of the alleged violation. Back pay will only be awarded for the period beginning 30 days before the employee's ...

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