|
|

New Jersey Equal Pay/Comparable Worth: What you need to know

The New Jersey Equal Pay Act prohibits employers from discriminating in the rate or method of payment of wages because of an employee's sex (NJ Rev. Stat. 34:11-56.1 et seq.).
Employers are also prohibited from retaliating against employees who engage in protected activity under the law. Employees are protected from retaliation if they take any of the following actions:
• Make a complaint to the employer, the labor department, or any other person,
• Start any proceeding under the Act or related to the Act, or
• Testify or are about to testify in any proceeding.
Pay differentials based on reasonable factors other than sex are permitted. In comparing jobs for equal pay purposes, the job title is irrelevant; the nature of the work is what matters. Thus, if janitors (typically male) and maids (typically female) perform the same type of work under the same conditions, they should be compensated equally.
The Act does not apply to nonprofit hospital associations or to persons employed in farm work or domestic service in a home or hotel.
For a Limited Time receive a FREE HR Report on the "Critical HR Recordkeeping”.  This exclusive special report covers hiring records, employment relationships, termination records, litigation issues, electronic information issues, tips for better recordkeeping, and a list of legal requirements.  Download Now
Reasonable factors other than sex typically include:
• Seniority
• Commission systems
• Performance or productivity based bonus systems
• Merit systems
Any such system must be bona fide. If the commissioner of labor determines that the system is merely a screen to hide discriminatory intent, it will be invalidated.
The Act requires employers with 50 or more employees to post a notice detailing a worker's right to be free of gender inequity or bias in pay, compensation, benefits, and other terms and conditions of employment under state and federal law (NJ Rev. Stat. 34:11-56.12 ). In addition, employers must provide ...

>> Read more about Equal Pay/Comparable Worth

More on this topic:

State Requirements

National | Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | District of Columbia | Florida | Georgia | Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming |

New Jersey Equal Pay/Comparable Worth Resources

Equal Pay/Comparable Worth Products

Free Special Reports
Get Your FREE HR Management Special Report. Download Any One Of These FREE Special Reports, Instantly!
Featured Special Report
Claim Your Free Copy of Critical HR Recordkeeping

Record retention is complex and time consuming. However, in addition to complying with various federal and state laws, keeping good, well-organized records can be very helpful in documenting and supporting an organization’s employment actions.
Download Now!


This special report will discuss how you can ensure your records are in good order, and establish a record-retention policy.

Topics covered:
1. Hiring Records
2. Employment Relationships
3. Termination Records
4. Litigation Issues
5. Electronic Information Issues
6. Tips for Better Recordkeeping
7. A List of Legal Requirements

Make sure you have the information you need to know to keep your records in order.