Mississippi Violence in the Workplace: What you need to know

Carrying concealed weapons is allowed with a license, but the statute provides that employers may ban concealed weapons on the premises by posting signs to that effect. It's not unlawful for persons over the age of 18 to have concealed weapons in their own places of business or vehicle. Employers may also prohibit weapons in a vehicle in a parking lot, parking garage, or other parking area the employer provides for employees to which access is restricted or limited through the use of a gate, security station, or other means of restricting or limiting general public access onto the property (MS Code Sec. 45-9-55).
Concealed weapons prohibited by law include any bowie knife, dirk knife, butcher knife, switchblade knife, metallic knuckles, blackjack, slingshot, pistol, revolver, or any rifle with a barrel of less than 16 inches in length, or any shotgun with a barrel of less than 18 inches in length, machine gun or any fully automatic firearm or deadly weapon, or any muffler or silencer for any firearm, whether or not it is accompanied by a firearm. Individuals may not use or attempt to use any imitation firearm against another person ( Miss. Code Ann. Sec. 97-37-1).
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State law allows for the use of deadly force without a duty to retreat when:
• Committed by public officers under certain enumerated circumstances
• Committed by any person in resisting an attempt to unlawfully kill or to commit any felony upon that person, or upon or in any dwelling, in any occupied vehicle, in any place of business, in any place of employment, or in the immediate premises in which that person is
• Committed in the lawful defense of oneself or any other person, where there is a ...

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