Nebraska Aliens and Immigration: What you need to know

Practices or policies that discriminate against immigrants legally eligible for employment may constitute national origin discrimination within the meaning of the Nebraska Fair Employment Practices Act (NE Rev. Stat. Sec. 48-1101 et seq.). The Act applies to all public employers and private employers with 15 or more employees.
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Citizenship requirements that are made a condition of employment discriminate on the basis of national origin in violation of the state law. Inquiries about a person's citizenship or country of birth are unlawful and imply discrimination based on national origin.
The Non-English-Speaking Workers Protection Law applies only to those private employers that:
• Employ 100 or more employees;
• Recruit and hire non-English-speaking workers from locations more than 500 miles from the worksite; and
• Employ members of any single non-English-speaking language group as 10 percent or more of its total workforce (NE Rev. Stat. Sec. 48-2207 et seq.).
Such employers must provide information about the job in question to each prospective new non-English-speaking employee prior to hire. The information must be in writing in the employee's native language, and the employee must read and sign the form before taking the job.
After hiring, the employer must provide bilingual individuals to assist the employee with learning and performing job responsibilities and must provide information on community services in the employee's native language. If the employee quits the job within 4 weeks of hire, the employer must provide transportation back to the employee's former place of residence. A violation of this law is a Class IV criminal ...

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