District of Columbia Jury Duty/ Court Appearance laws & HR compliance analysis

District of Columbia Jury Duty/ Court Appearance: What you need to know

The District of Columbia prohibits employers from discharging, threatening, or otherwise coercing workers who are summoned for jury duty or serve as jurors or who are summoned for witness service.
Employers that violate the law may be charged with contempt of court, fined, and imprisoned up to 30 days for a first offense. Subsequent offenses could result in a fine of up to $5,000 and up to 180 days' imprisonment.
Employees discharged in violation of this provision may sue for reinstatement, lost wages, damages, and attorneys' fees (DC Code Sec. 11-1913).
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Private employers. Private employers with 10 or more employees are required to grant up to 5 days' paid leave for an employee's grand jury or petit jury duty, less any fees received from the court (DC Code Sec. 15-718).
An employee is not eligible for paid leave for jury duty if he or she would not have earned wages while serving on jury duty or would not have worked more than half of a shift that extends into the next day.
Public employers. District employees are entitled to paid leave when they are summoned for jury duty or witness service in cases in which the United States, the District of Columbia, or a state or local government is a party (DC Code Sec. 1-612.03(l)).
Best practices. Regardless of state law requirements, most employers do pay all employees called to jury duty or court appearances.
The prevailing attitude among employers is that an employee summoned to serve on a jury or to testify has a civic obligation and that it is the company's responsibility to support the fulfillment of that obligation. This is achieved by protecting the employee from loss of income and by making the necessary arrangements to cover for him or her during ...

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District of Columbia Jury Duty/ Court Appearance Resources

Type Title
Checklists Jury Duty Checklist
Forms Form to Notify Employee of Subpoena
Letters Excuse Employee from Jury Duty
Policies Subpoenas/Court Appearance
See all Jury Duty/ Court Appearance Resources