New Jersey Jury Duty/ Court Appearance laws & HR compliance analysis

New Jersey Jury Duty/ Court Appearance: What you need to know

Jury duty. Under state law, an employer may not penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee with respect to employment because the employee is required to attend court for jury service (NJ Rev. Stat. Sec. 2B:20-17).
Employers may obtain verification of an employee's service by sending a written request to the jury management office of the appropriate court.
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Witnesses. The New Jersey Conscientious Employee Protection Act prohibits employers from retaliating against employees who provide information to or testify before any public body conducting an investigation, hearing, or inquiry into any violation of the law. Employers aren't required to pay employees for leave taken for witness duty.
The New Jersey Law Against Discrimination prohibits retaliation against any witness who testifies in any proceeding under the Act (NJ Rev. Stat. Sec. 34:19-3 and NJ Rev. Stat. Sec. 10:5-12(d)).
Additionally, under the New Jersey Security and Financial Empowerment Act (NJ SAFE Act), employers must provide up to 20 days of unpaid leave for a person who is the victim of a domestic violence incident or sexually violent offense or whose child, parent, spouse, or partner was the victim of such an incident for multiple reasons, including to attend court proceedings (NJ Rev. Stat. Sec. 34:11C-1).
Private employers. State law does not require private employers to pay employees for absences caused by jury duty or court appearances.
Note: Nonpayment of wages by an employer is not considered a valid reason for being excused from jury duty in New Jersey (NJ Rev. Stat. Sec. 2B:20-16).
Public employers. Public employers are required to excuse any full-time employee for jury service in any state court, any federal district ...

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