Utah Jury Duty/ Court Appearance laws & HR compliance analysis

Utah Jury Duty/ Court Appearance: What you need to know

Jury duty. An employer may not discharge, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee because the employee responds to a summons for jury service or serves as a juror or grand juror.
Furthermore, an employer may not require an employee to use annual vacation or sick time for time spent in response to a summons or for jury service (UT Code Sec. 78B-1-116).
An employer that violates these provisions is guilty of criminal contempt and may be fined, imprisoned, or both. An employee discharged in violation of this section may sue the employer within 30 days of discharge for reinstatement and up to 6 weeks of lost wages.
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Court appearance. An employer may not discharge or otherwise coerce or threaten an employee because he or she responded to a subpoena or was summoned to a deposition or hearing (UT Code Sec. 78B-1-132).
Employers that violate this law are guilty of criminal contempt and face a fine and possible imprisonment. The employer may also face civil action for lost wages and attorneys' fees.
Private employers. State law does not require private employers to pay employees for absences caused by jury duty or court appearances.
Public employers. Public employees are entitled to a leave of absence with full pay to serve on a jury. Employees who choose to use annual leave instead of paid jury leave are entitled to keep jurors fees; otherwise, jurors fees received must be returned to agency payroll clerks for deposit with the state treasurer.
Public employees are also entitled to a leave of absence with full pay when they are subpoenaed to appear as witnesses as part of their employment with the federal government or the state or to serve as witnesses in a grievance hearing.
Public employees who are absent ...

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