Oregon National Origin Discrimination laws & HR compliance analysis

Oregon National Origin Discrimination: What you need to know

The Oregon Fair Employment Practice Act prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of national origin, including ancestry, or on the basis of with whom the person associates (OR Rev. Stat. Sec. 659A.030et seq.). The law applies to all public and private employers in the state. Under the state law, it is an unlawful employment practice to:
For a Limited Time receive a FREE HR Report on the "Critical HR Recordkeeping”.  This exclusive special report covers hiring records, employment relationships, termination records, litigation issues, electronic information issues, tips for better recordkeeping, and a list of legal requirements.  Download Now
• Refuse to hire, discharge, or otherwise discriminate with respect to an individual's compensation, terms, or conditions of employment on the basis of national origin.
• Discriminate against an individual because of the national origin of any other person with whom the individual associates.
• Retaliate against any individual who has opposed any unlawful practice, or has made a complaint, testified, or assisted in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing under the state law.
• Aid, abet, incite, compel, or coerce a person to commit unlawful discrimination or to attempt to do so.
• Publish an advertisement for employment indicating a preference, limitation, specification, or discrimination based on national origin or ancestry, unless national origin is a bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ)
Discrimination based on association. A federal district court in Oregon has ruled that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) could not proceed on its claim that a white employee was fired because of his friendship with Hispanic employees (EEOC v. Parra, No. 05-1521-HO (D. Ore. 2008)). In this case, EEOC claimed the employer treated the white employee more harshly that it did employees who did not associate with Hispanic employees. However, the court ruled that the friendship did not rise "to a level sufficient to invoke a claim of associational discrimination." The ...

Read more about National Origin Discrimination