District of Columbia Privacy laws & HR compliance analysis

District of Columbia Privacy: What you need to know

The District of Columbia recognizes all four common-law invasion-of-privacy claims:
• Intrusion upon solitude or seclusion;
• Public disclosure of private facts (e.g., unreasonable publicity given to one's private life);
• False light privacy (e.g., publicity that normally places the other in a false light before the public); and
• Appropriation of one's name or likeness (Dresbach v. Doubleday & Co., 518 F. Supp. 1285 (D.D.C. 1981)).
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A person commits identity theft if he or she:
• Uses the personal identifying information of another person to fraudulently obtain property without that person's consent;
• Obtains, creates, or possesses the personal identifying information of another person to fraudulently obtain property without that person's consent or gives, sells, transmits, or transfers the information to a third person to fraudulently obtain property; or
• Uses personal identifying information of another person without the person's consent for identification at the time of his or her arrest, to conceal or facilitate a crime, or to avoid detection, apprehension, or prosecution for a crime (DC Code Sec. 22-3227.02).
Personal identifying information includes an individual's:
• Name, address, telephone number, date of birth, or mother's maiden name;
• Driver's license or driver's license number or non-driver's license or non-driver's license number;
• Savings, checking, or other financial account number;
• Social Security number or tax identification number;
• Passport or passport number;
• Citizenship status, visa, or alien registration card or number;
• Birth certificate;
• Credit or debit card or credit or debit card number;
• Credit history or credit rating;
• Signature;
• Personal identification ...

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