Kentucky Flammable Liquids laws & safety compliance analysis

Kentucky Flammable Liquids: What you need to know

Comparison: State vs. Federal

Kentucky has adopted the federal safety and health rules for the handling and storage of flammable liquids in general industry workplaces by reference (803 Kentucky Administrative Regulations (KAR) 2:307). The state has also adopted additional requirements for employees with respect to receiving and unloading bulk hazardous liquids (803 KAR 2:019).

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Kentucky has its own federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. The Kentucky Labor Cabinet’s Kentucky Occupational Safety and Health Program (KyOSH) governs both public and private sector workplaces, except for the Tennessee Valley Authority and federal facilities.

State Requirements
803 KAR 2:019

Labeling. Bulk chemical receiving and storage facilities (capable of unloading tank trucks or trailers) that handle hazardous liquids (defined as a chemical or mixture of chemicals that is toxic, an irritant, a corrosive, a strong oxidizer, a strong sensitizer, combustible, flammable, extremely flammable, dangerously reactive or pressure-generating, or which otherwise may cause substantial personal injury or substantial illness during routine or reasonably foreseeable handling or use), must ensure that signs and labels indicate appropriate contents and item identification at receiving and dispensing connections, valves, tanks, and the storage area perimeter. The signs and labels must be readily legible at normal operating positions.

Authorized person. Only those persons trained and authorized will make the required chemical identification and perform or supervise the unloading of hazardous chemicals. Before unloading, the authorized person must make an inspection of the accompanying papers, check ...

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Comparison: State vs. Federal
State Requirements