Oregon Hazard Communication laws & safety compliance analysis

Oregon Hazard Communication : What you need to know

COMPARISON: STATE VS. FEDERAL

Oregon has adopted the federal hazard communication standard for the general industry and construction industry by reference, and has adopted additional rules for pipe labeling and certain agricultural activities. The state operates a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Therefore, public and private employers are subject to the state's rules. See the national HAZARD COMMUNICATION STANDARD analysis for more information about the federal rule.

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State rules require agricultural employers to provide hand-laborers with a specific safe practices brochure and access upon request to safety data sheets (SDSs)—formally known as material safety data sheets (MSDS)—for all residual hazardous chemicals they may be reasonably expected to contact. See the state MSDS/SDS analysis for further information.

OR-OSHA administers and enforces all private and public (state and local government) sector workplace requirements of the hazard communication standard for general industry, construction, and agricultural activities in the state.

STATE REQUIREMENTS
GENERAL INDUSTRY
PIPE LABELING
OAR 437-002-0378

All pipes and piping systems (including valves and pipe coverings) that contain hazardous substances or that use asbestos as a pipe insulation material in the workplace must be labeled. The hazardous contents of the piping must be identified with lettered labels with sufficient detail to identify the hazard.

The employer may use signs, placards, process sheets, batch tickets, operating procedures, or other written materials in lieu of affixing labels to individual pipes, as long as the alternative method identifies the pipe(s).

Labels must be applied:

  • Where confusion may occur, such as ...

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